Monster Character Research Pt.1

I have compiled a list of supernatural and mythological beings to use, or draw inspiration from for the main monster within my story. I have included as much basic information needed on each creature/being/etc, including folklore from different regions/countries/towns/etc, if the being owns different names and where those names originated from. Currently I am unsure whether to use/be inspired from just one of these or combine them to create my final main monster.

 

Bogeyman

Bogeyman (usually spelled boogeyman in the U.S.; also spelled bogieman or boogie man), is a common allusion to a mythical creature in many cultures used by adults to frighten children into good behaviour. This monster has no specific appearance, and conceptions about it can vary drastically from household to household within the same community; in many cases, he has no set appearance in the mind of an adult or child, but is simply a non-specific embodiment of terror. Parents may tell their children that if they misbehave, the bogeyman will get them. Bogeymen may target a specific mischief or general misbehaviour, depending on what purpose needs serving. In some cases, the bogeyman is a nickname for the devil. Bogeyman tales vary by region. The bogeyman is usually a masculine entity, but can be any gender, or simply be androgynous.

 

Maya

Maya (IAST: māyā), literally “illusion” or “magic”, has multiple meanings in Indian philosophies depending on the context. In ancient Vedic literature, Māyā literally implies extraordinary power and wisdom. In later Vedic texts and modern literature dedicated to Indian traditions, Māyā connotes a “magic show, an illusion where things appear to be present but are not what they seem”. Māyā is also a spiritual concept connoting “that which exists, but is constantly changing and thus is spiritually unreal”, and the “power or the principle that conceals the true character of spiritual reality”.

Māyā (Sanskrit: माया) is a word with unclear etymology, probably comes from the root mā[10][11][12] which means “to measure”.
According to Monier Williams, māyā meant “wisdom and extraordinary power” in an earlier older language, but from the Vedic period onwards, the word came to mean “illusion, unreality, deception, fraud, trick, sorcery, witchcraft and magic”. However, P. D. Shastri states that the Monier Williams’ list is a “loose definition, misleading generalization”, and not accurate in interpreting ancient Vedic and medieval era Sanskrit texts; instead, he suggests a more accurate meaning of māyā is “appearance, not mere illusion”.

According to William Mahony, the root of the word may be man- or “to think”, implying the role of imagination in the creation of the world. In early Vedic usage, the term implies, states Mahony, “the wondrous and mysterious power to turn an idea into a physical reality”.
Franklin Southworth states the word’s origin is uncertain, and other possible roots of māyā include may- meaning mystify, confuse, intoxicate, delude, as well as māy- which means “disappear, be lost”.

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